Excerpts from Enter at Your Own Risk: Dark Muses, Spoken Silences

Read selections from each of the modern authors in this collection! Explore the haunting questions, dark shadows, and sinister plots they reveal about these classic stories.

 

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Reimagining Poe’s The Black Cat:

Anonymous, Satisfaction Brought Her Back

Blaze McRob, The Wife and the Witch

Timothy Hurley, Poe’s Black Cats

 

Reimagining Irving’s The Legend of Sleepy Hollow:

T. Fox Dunham, Hollow Longing

Carole Gill, Katrina’s Confession

Marcus Kohler, The Horseman’s Tale

 

Reimagining Lovecraft’s The Call of Cthulhu:

Mike Chinn, Considering the Dead

Gregory L. Norris, The Whisper of Cthulhu

 

Reimagining Polidori’s The Vampyre:

B.E. Scully, The Tygre

Jon Michael Kelley, The Silent Highwayman

                                                                                                                      
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One night, returning home, much intoxicated, from one of my haunts about town, I fancied that the cat avoided my presence. I seized him; when, in his fright at my violence, he inflicted a slight wound upon my hand with his teeth. The fury of a demon instantly possessed me. I knew myself no longer. My original soul seemed, at once, to take its flight from my body and a more than fiendish malevolence, gin-nurtured, thrilled every fiber of my frame. I took from my waistcoat-pocket a pen-knife, opened it, grasped the poor beast by the throat, and deliberately cut one of its eyes from the socket! I blush, I burn, I shudder, while I pen the damnable atrocity.

~ The Black Cat by Edgar Allan Poe

 

 

ghost3All the stories of ghosts and goblins that he had heard in the afternoon now came crowding upon his recollection. The night grew darker and darker; the stars seemed to sink deeper in the sky, and driving clouds occasionally hid them from his sight. He had never felt so lonely and dismal. He was, moreover, approaching the very place where many of the scenes of the ghost stories had been laid. In the center of the road stood an enormous tulip-tree, which towered like a giant above all the other trees of the neighborhood, and formed a kind of landmark. Its limbs were gnarled and fantastic, large enough to form trunks for ordinary trees, twisting down almost to the earth, and rising again into the air. It was connected with the tragical story of the unfortunate André, who had been taken prisoner hard by; and was universally known by the name of Major André’s tree. The common people regarded it with a mixture of respect and superstition, partly out of sympathy for the fate of its ill-starred namesake, and partly from the tales of strange sights, and doleful lamentations, told concerning it.

~ The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving

                                                                

 Then the men, having reached a spot where the trees were thinner, came suddenly in sight of the spectacle itself. Four of them reeled, one fainted, and two were shaken into a frantic cry which the mad cacophony of the orgy fortunately deadened. Legrasse dashed swamp water on the face of the fainting man, and all stood trembling and nearly hypnotized with horror.

~ The Call of Cthulhu by H.P. Lovecraft

 

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skull-gothic-ipad-backgroundThey soon arrived at Rome, and Aubrey for a time lost sight of his companion; he left him in daily attendance upon the morning circle of an Italian countess, whilst he went in search of the memorials of another almost deserted city. Whilst he was thus engaged, letters arrived from England, which he opened with eager impatience; the first was from his sister, breathing nothing but affection; the others were from his guardians, the latter astonished him; if it had before entered into his imagination that there was an evil power resident in his companion, these seemed to give him sufficient reason for the belief. His guardians insisted upon his immediately leaving his friend, and urged, that his character was dreadfully vicious, for that the possession of irresistible powers of seduction, rendered his licentious habits more dangerous to society. It had been discovered, that his contempt for the adulteress had not originated in hatred of her character; but that he had required, to enhance his gratification, that his victim, the partner of his guilt, should be hurled from the pinnacle of unsullied virtue, down to the lowest abyss of infamy and degradation: in fine, that all those females whom he had sought, apparently on account of their virtue, had, since his departure, thrown even the mask aside, and had not scrupled to expose the whole deformity of their vices to the public gaze.

~ The Vampyre by John Polidori

 

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dark muses medEnter At Your Own Risk:

Dark Muses, Spoken Silences

available on Amazon.com